Mobility has grown for a long time above-average to the gross national product. However, this big growth also has negative impacts: ecological pollution, land consumption, urban sprawl etc. Especially the following questions need to be dealt with:

  • Should we pursue a detachment of the traffic growth from the growth of the economy, as it is done in the energy sector? Is such a detachment possible at all? By what means?
  • How can we decrease the negative ecological impacts of traffic?
  • How can traffic and settlement development be better coordinated?

All traffic carriers (street, rail, air) are more and more reaching their limits of capacity. This leads to traffic jams on the streets, standing places on the trains, and economic damages. The limits of capacity are typically restricted to a few peak hours a day.

  • To what extent should the limits of capacity be reduced by an expansion of infrastructure and/or by influence on the demand (flattening peak traffic)?
  • What are the financial and ecological limits as to expansion?
  • What means shall be applied to regulate the demands: voluntary measures of economy and society, price signals, etc.?

In a long term view, much more financial means are required for maintenance and necessary expansions than it is the case today. The public traffic financing is reaching its limits for the reason that the taxpayers’ money is too tight for all the tasks which need to be covered. Furthermore, the major source of the public traffic financing – petroleum tax – is constantly decreasing and one day it will be drained completely.

  • What should the future ratio between state and consumer financing on streets and rails look like?
  • How can the willingness for a higher consumer financing be reached?
  • What substitute for the petroleum tax can be found on the side of the state?

The digital revolution concerns all areas of economy and society, and will have similar disruptive impacts as the industrial revolution of the 19th century. First impacts also appear in the sector of mobility (self-propelled cars, “Uber”, electronic ticketing, digital solutions for mobility etc.). And that is only the beginning of such revolutionary turns.

  • What does the digitalization mean for the various traffic carriers (street, rail, air) and for the companies and actors active in those sectors?
  • What opportunities does the digitalization offer for an intelligent and sustainable mobility? What are the risks?
  • What road map is necessary in order for traffic in Switzerland to keep up with the swift developments?

Among all traffic carriers, the state plays a decisive and essential role as a regulator, owner and funder.

  • How will the role of the state change in the context of a future digital mobility?
  • How will the future distribution of tasks between state, public enterprises, private sector and further actors look like?
  • How can we make sure that incentives for enterprises and their customers are stimulated correctly (compare today’s “railway economics”)?

The digital revolution concerns all areas of economy and society, and will have similar disruptive impacts as the industrial revolution of the 19th century. First impacts also appear in the sector of mobility (self-propelled cars, “Uber”, electronic ticketing, digital solutions for mobility etc.). And that is only the beginning of such revolutionary turns.

  • What does the digitalization mean for the various traffic carriers (street, rail, air) and for the companies and actors active in those sectors?
  • What opportunities does the digitalization offer for an intelligent and sustainable mobility?
  • What are the risks?
  • What road map is necessary in order for traffic in Switzerland to keep up with the swift developments?